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Millennium Institute is at work in developing and industrialized countries around the world. The map below shows the regions of the world where we have on-going projects.



Africa
With a population of 703 million, over half of who live on $1 a day or less, Africa is the world’s poorest continent. According to data from the World Bank and UNDP’s Human Development Report, 34 of the world’s poorest 48 countries, and 24 of the 32 countries ranked lowest in human development, are in Africa.

Africa has taken positive strides in recent years, recording an average annual growth rate of 4 percent, reducing the number of violent conflicts, improving governance, and putting democratic structures in place. Despite these commendable gains, the statistics indicate that Africa still has a long way to go to effectively meet the human development needs of its people.

The international community’s renewed commitment to Africa’s development is most welcome. Initiatives such as debt relief, removal of trade barriers to promote increased international trade, and increase in aid are key parts of that commitment. However, for Africa to "claim the 21st century", we must begin to address its challenges in an integrated manner, using tools that illuminate the consequences of policy choices and identify the best ways to reach the Millennium Development Goals, develop poverty reduction strategies, and design other regional and national development plans.
Learn about Threshold 21 projects in Africa

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Latin America and Caribbean Region
The Latin America and Caribbean region is home to over 500 million people. It is rich in human and natural resources, is the most urbanized region in the developing world, and experiences impressive growth rates. Still, 25 percent of inhabitants live on less than $2 a day. In Latin America, deep inequality hinders development, while Caribbean states are highly vulnerable to natural disasters and external shocks, both of which exacerbate poverty.

In order for the region to exploit its potential, a planning tool is needed – one that is dynamic, incorporates economic, social, environmental considerations in its analysis, and supports monitoring progress toward the Millennium Development Goals, and other international development goals.
Learn about Threshold 21 projects in Latin American and Caribbean

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United States of America
The United States is arguably the richest and most industrialized country in the world. It also consumes the most natural resources and produces more waste and pollution than any other country in the world. But the United States can set an example for the world by making changes that assure a sustainable future for our planet. A model that addresses these issues in an integrated and transparent way can mobilize action towards a sustainable energy future for the United States.
Learn more about Threshold 21 projects in the USA

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Balkans Region
After a decade of conflict and instability following the dissolution of the former Yugoslavia, the Balkans region is moving towards stability. Its entities are embarking on regional cooperation initiatives and looking to become a member of the European Union in the near future. A tool that supports visioning and scenario-building to illuminate the implications of different policy choices is critical to consolidate the peace this region is building.
Learn about the Multi Entity Gaming model for the Balkans

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Asia and Pacific Region
Half the world’s population lives in this region of over 3 billion people. Although, on the average, the region is enjoying impressive economic growth and reduction in poverty, significant differences among and within the countries persist. China, for instance, continues to be a strong economic power in the region, and in turn, lifting millions of out poverty; yet about 160 million still live on less than $1 a day. Countries in South Asia fare much worse, with more than half of its population living in poverty. The tsunami of 2005, political instability in Nepal and Indonesia, as well as the threat of HIV/AIDS, all contribute to exacerbate the challenges faced in this region.

In order to achieve income equality, social stability, and build infrastructure and institutions that bridges the rural-urban divide, a planning tool able to analyze the challenges confronting the region in a dynamic and integrated manner is required.
Learn about Threshold 21 projects in Asia and The Pacific

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